Weishaupt

Hic situs est Phaethon, currus auriga paterni,
Quem si non tenuit, magnis tamen excidit ausis.

Weishaupt Not A Jew

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk%3AAdam_Weishaupt

Nesta H. Webster:

It has frequently been suggested that his real inspirers were Jews, and the Jewish writer Bernard Lazare definitely states that “there were Jews, Cabalistic Jews, around Weishaupt.”1 A writer in La Vieille France went so far as to designate these Jews as Moses Mendelssohn, Wessely, and the bankers Itzig, Friedlander, and Meyer. But no documentary evidence has ever been produced in support of these statements. It is therefore necessary to examine them in the light of probability.

Now, as I have already shown, the theosophical ideas of the Cabala play no part in the system of Illuminism; the only trace of Cabalism to be found amongst the papers of the Order is a list of recipes for procuring abortion, for making aphrodisiacs, Aqua Toffana, pestilential vapours, etc., headed “Cabala Major.”2 It is possible, then, that the Illuminati may have learnt something of “venefic magic” and the use of certain natural substances from Jewish Cabalists; at the same time Jews appear to have been only in rare cases admitted to the Order. Everything indeed tends to prove that Weishaupt and his first coadjutors, Zwack and Massenhausen, were pure Germans.

1. It has several times been stated that Weishaupt was himself a Jew. I cannot find the slightest evidence to this effect.
2. Originalschriften, pp. 107-10.

From the excellent author Terry Melanson comes a thorough refutation of Weishaupt’s alleged association with Rothschild.

There was an explicit directive in the Illuminati that “Jews, pagans, women, monks and members of other secret Orders” were forbidden from entry (Einige Originalschriften…, p. 54). In fact, only a handful of Jews during the 18th century had even managed to become Freemasons. In German speaking lands, Jews—Rothschild included—were confined to the ghettos. They had to get permission to travel and certainly didn’t socialize with the educated and noble class.

Once again, however, I would be remiss (and dishonest) not to include the fact that Weishaupt, in his early years, by his own admission, had indeed consulted the Kabbalah, also dabbling in alchemical transmutation and spirit invocation. He said that he was crazy for doing so, that “the passage from credulity and bigotry to disbelief is very easy,” and it took him “a thousand follies and aberrations” to reach his current state of mind, divesting himself from the path of error (see Lionel Duvoy’s translation, Adam Weishaupt: Introduction à mon Apologie, Editions Grammata, 2010, p. 48).

Image 2

5) Schwätzer, Schwelger, Wollüstige, Eigensinnige, Stölze, Rohe und Ungesellschaftliche, Großsprecher – Unbeständige Lügner, Eigennützige sind durchgehends verworfen, es wäre denn die nächste Hofnung zur Besserung.
Gossipers, revelers, lechers, wayward, haughty, violent and non-social, loudmouths – fickle liars, selfish people are consistently rejected,

6) Desgleichen sind auch eingeschlossen Juden, Heiden, Weibspersonen, Mönche, und Mitglieder anderer geheimen Orden.
Also included are Jews, pagans, women, monks, and members of other secret orders.

Rosenberg:

The Track of the Jew
Before, however, I pass on to these matters, an extremely important factor must be emphasised: the acceptance of the Jews into the secret societies.
The Jewish people, scattered through all the countries and yet closely bound together, are, by their very nature, the born conspiratorial people. Theoretically, the international theories of Freemasonry now posed no hindrance to the Jews.
Already in 1722 it was declared in England that “Masonry is an association of men for the spread of tolerant and humane principles in whose efforts the Jew and the Turk can take part as much as the Christian”.
Nevertheless, the aversion with regard to the Jews was not one easily to be overcome and only through sly moves was he able to creep in and, master of intrigues, rule. In 1754, a Portuguese Jew, Martinez Paschalis, founded a Cabalistic sect into which Jews streamed in large numbers.
After his death, Saint Martin took over the leadership of the society. It developed branches through all countries and even into Russia (the Martinists). In England, Toland had worked for the naturalisation of the English Jews and wrote two works (1713 and 1718) to this end; in Germany, the Jewish salons had become centres of political influence; Mendelssohn had won over Lessing for the Jewish goals and was able to mould him for them; at his request, Dohm wrote (1781) the above-mentioned work on the reform of the Jewish policy whose proposals, as we saw, served Mirabeau as the basis of his promotion of Jewish interests. In this way the morale and the power of the Jewish lodges was sufficiently strengthened to effect their quite official acceptance into the whole association. This happened in the memorable convention in Wilhelmsbad in 1781.
There the founder of the German order of Illuminati, Weishaupt, had called a congress of all secret societies. There appeared delegates from all the countries of Europe, America, even from Asia. Here all conspiracies were unified under the formula of Weishaupt “to unite men of all countries, all classes and all religions for a higher interest and in a durable association”. And the representative of the French Martinists declared to an inquiry regarding the results of the congress: “I shall not give you the secrets that I bring; but what I think I can say to you is that a conspiracy has been instigated and that it will be difficult for religion and governments not to fall.”

Rosenberg warned against Jewish involvement in secret societies, some of which had participated in Weishaupt’s convening of secret societies, but he explicitly said that the Illuminati was German. This is the only mention of Weishaupt and his movement I could find in translated National Socialist literature. This would have been Rosenberg’s best opportunity to denounce it as a Jewish movement, if it really were.

Weishaupt was strongly influenced by Christoph Meiners, who was a polygenist.

https://books.google.com/books?id=qSGpAAAAQBAJ&pg=PA197
Ludwig Schemann (1852-1938), who seems also to have been an admirer of the work of Christoph Meiners, contributed to the formation of NS ideology…

Hitler Youth Manual, 1938:
They refused, for example, to allow the well-known student of races, Ludwig Schemann, to continue his studies regarding the nature of races and deprived him of the means for his researches.

Again, from Melanson’s article, German Illuminati expert Monika Neugebauer-Wölk writes:

From the outset, the Illuminaten Order evidently regarded itself as a competitor in an emporium … Between 1777 and 1779, Weishaupt developed the foundations of a grade system, initiatory rites, and a language using geographical and historical terminology…

For this purpose, two texts on the history of religion by the Göttingen professor of philosophy Christoph Meiners (1747-1810) were fundamental, namely Über die Mysterien der Alten, besonders über die Eleusinischen Geheimnisse (1776) and De Zoroastris vita, institutis, doctrina et libris Commentatio prior (1778).

As early as January, 1778, we find Weishaupt recommending Meiners to his trusted student/disciple/initiate, Franz Xaver von Zwack (Cato). “[R]ead … Various Philosophic [Writings] from Meiners, in three parts,” Weishaupt writes. “In the latter, one finds a treatise on the Eleusinian mysteries, that will bring you great enlightenment” (Einige Originalschriften des Illuminatenordens, pp. 198-9).

Churchill, who was a Zionist, wanting to malign Jewish Communists in his 1920 article Zionism versus Bolshevism, would erroneously link up Weishaupt’s Illuminati with Marxism. Completely unfounded speculation!

✡Manly P. Hall:
Weishaupt emerged as a faithful servant of a higher cause. … The physical history of the Bavarian Illuminati extended over a period of only twelve years. It is difficult to understand, therefore, the profound stir which this movement caused in the political life of Europe. We are forced to the realization that this Bavarian group was only one fragment of a large and composite design. … The ideals of Illuminism, as they are found in the pagan Mysteries of antiquity, were old when Weishaupt was born, and it is unlikely that these long-cherished convictions perished with his Bavarian experiment. The work that was unfinished in 1785 remains unfinished in 1950.

[The Masonic philosopher Hall furnishes a misleading narrative by linking Weishaupt up with the schools Freemasonry claims to be founded on. But he does reasonably point out the implications of the Illuminati’s appearance on the world and recognizes that Weishaupt was moved by a higher truth.]

Laurency (L3e1):
21It should be emphatically stated once and for all that what was taught in esoteric knowledge orders down the ages has remained esoteric. Everything said on pertaining matters is the false statements of ignorance. The uninitiated have never been imparted the knowledge of the initiates. Nothing whatsoever of what Christos taught his disciples has ever been given out to outsiders. The knowledge was permitted for publication starting in 1875, and it was divulged in small portions in the years 1875–1950. Everything said before that time is non-esoteric. And what was taught in so-called occult orders after that time is mere occult quasi-knowledge. When the knowledge has been set free it cannot be made secret again. All attempts at doing so amount to deception.

Laurency ():
20The year 1775 was an important one in the history of mankind. [Count of] Saint Germain had been trying all over Europe to interest people in setting up secret societies in which they could “think freely”, undisturbed by the mental tyranny of the Church. And such societies had sprung up like mushrooms. Most of them died out of themselves. Many of them later got into the hands of charlatans, which is another story. Cagliostro had been given the task, not of “preparing for” the French Revolution, but of taking measures to prevent its degeneration.

Laurency (L3e5):
5The two initiators of the publication of esoterics, 45-selves M. and K. H. [Pythagoras], said as early as in 1882 that the Theosophical Society was an attempt that had failed. They had seen the futility of trying to liberate the West from its idiologies. They admitted that the planetary hierarchy, who in 1775 considered that the issue was broached too early and were against the experiment, were right.
12Both M. and K.H., who in the year 1775 had voiced their desire to publicize the knowledge, hitherto kept secret, and after a great hesitation and against the advice of all were permitted to do so, realized soon enough (as early as 1882) that mankind was not mature and that the attempt made had been premature.

Weishaupt:
I wanted what the representatives of ecclesiastical and worldly power ought to be doing and wanting on the strength of their offices, and I wanted this because they are neglecting it.
I wanted all these things, and I believe to this hour, despite all persecutions already suffered and still lying before me, that this idea is a great one, albeit too premature for such times and thus unluckily calculated. If my contemporaries happen to be of another opinion, to me this appears to prove that their enthusiasm for virtue is capable of growth.

[
Franz Hartmann’s assessment of the Illuminati
. He calls out the activities of the quasi-Rosicrucians, who were directly opposed to Weishaupt’s order. In particular, he indicts Johann Christoph von Wöllner as a subversive.]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederick_William_II_of_Prussia#Mysticism_and_religious_policies
Although Wöllner’s religious edict had many critics, it was an important measure that, in fact, proved an important stabilizing factor for the Prussian state. Aimed at protecting the multi-confessional rights enshrined in the 1648 Peace of Westphalia, the provisions of Wöllner’s edict were intended to safeguard against religious strife by imposing a system of state sponsored limits.[5] The edict was also a notable step forward regarding the rights of Jews, Mennonites, and Herrnhut brethren, who now received full state protection.[5]

Hitler, Table Talk (Cameron & Stevens), August 26, 1942:
It was the Peace of Westphalia which was the foundation of the permanent weakness of modern Germany. I have always said to my supporters: “It is not the Treaty of Versailles we must destroy, but the Treaty of Westphalia.” The French, of course, regarded the Versailles Treaty as just a continuation of the Westphalian Peace.

Laurency ():
10The Rosicrucian Order was founded in 1375, in an age when the Catholic Church ruled and persecuted. In this Order, the initiates knew nothing of each other, nothing of higher degrees; only the initiator was known under a cover name. This was the reason why, for instance, Goethe, who was an initiate, did not suspect that Cagliostro was a member of the Order and had attained its highest degree, being a personal disciple of Saint Germain (both were members of the planetary hierarchy).

[Cagliostro was suspected to be a Jew, but this could be another case of cultural appropriation or calumny.]

https://hitlerianhylozoics.wordpress.com/goethe/

Laurency ():
4Also Goethe was initiated into the Rosicrucian Order but did not go high in degrees (being too emotional). His statements about Cagliostro prove this. Since the initiates of lower degrees did not know those of higher degrees, such a mistake is understandable. By attacking Cagliostro Goethe demonstrated his limitation and made two serious mistakes at the same time: having faith in gossip and the opinions of other people, and judging. In so doing he blocked his own path of advancement. The fact that Goethe nevertheless took an interest in the “notorious charlatan” indicates that he had a “hunch” that it was something “mysterious” about him.

https://www.faust.com/legend/cagliostro/goethe-on-cagliostro/

‘A little before the end of my journey,’ notes the great writer under date April 13, 1787, ‘an interesting adventure happened to me. During my stay at Palermo, I had often heard Cagliostro talked about at table, and stories told of him. The Palermites were all agreed on one point, to wit, that the mysterious personage was no other than a certain Giuseppe Balsamo, who, after more than one piece of scoundrelism, had been driven from the town. He was recognised in the published portraits. I learnt thus that a jurist of Palermo, at the request of the French Ministry, had made inquiries into the origin of this man, who had had the audacity, in the course of a grave and momentous trial, to retail the most absurd fables in the tace of all France one may say, of the whole world. I asked to be introduced to the man of law, and was presented to him. He showed me the genealogical tree, drawn out by him, of the family to which Cagliostro belonged, and the notes and documents which had assisted him to compile a memoir, which he had just sent to France.’ After perusing these, Goethe expressed the desire to be presented to Balsamo’s mother and sister, who were living in the town.

A True Servant of Christ

Einige Originalschriften des Illuminatenordens, p. 54:

5. Man soll sich aber ohne besondere Erlaubniß hinter keinen machen, außer
However, one should not [] without special permission, unless

1) er sey von christlicher Religion.
He is of the Christian religion.

2) Jünger oder im gleichen Alter mit dem Aufnehmer.
Youth or in the same age as the pick-up.

3) Man finde an ihm ein großes menschenfreundliches, und wohlwollendes Herz.
One finds a great philanthropic, and benevolent heart about him.

4) Außerdem aber habe er entweder Verstand (Hier ist es doch besser, wenn er seine Aufklärung erst dem Orden zu verdanken) oder Geschicklichkeit in Künsten, er sey fleißiggenau, ein guter Haushälter und von gutem Ruf.

Furthermore however, he either has mind (here, however, it is better, if ) or skill at arts, he is diligent, a good housekeeper and from good reputation.

Thomas Jefferson:
Letter to Bishop James Madison, January 31, 1800
https://founders.archives.gov/documents/Jefferson/01-31-02-0297
Barruel’s own parts of the book are perfectly the ravings of a Bedlamite. But he quotes largely from Wishaupt whom he considers as the founder of what he calls the order. As you may not have had an opportunity of forming a judgment of this cry of ‘mad dog’ which has been raised against his doctrines, I will give you the idea I have formed from only an hour’s reading of Barruel’s quotations from him which you may be sure are not the most favourable. Wishaupt seems to be an enthusiastic Philanthropist. He is among those (as you know the excellent Price and Priestly also are) who believe in the indefinite perfectibility of man.

[It’s worth noting that in 1804, four years later, Jefferson would pen a treatise on The Philosophy of the Nazareth. And in 1820, he published what would come to be known as the Jefferson Bible. Coincidence? I think not. Weishaupt may have motivated and prompted Jefferson to attempt a purification of Christianity.]

Weishaupt:
Supplement to the Justification of My Intentions
Translated by Tony Page
On this basis, I now turn to the illumination of the documents printed in the second part of this Supplement. … In the essay itself, a new ‘folk’s religion’ is spoken of, a folk’s religion which has need of being introduced [into society]. I had no part in this/no sympathy with this [keinen Antheil an], and still less was it discussed.

The intended meaning of the signatories [of this document] may well have been no other than that an effort should be made to cleanse the Christian religion, as far as possible, of the abuses which have crept into it and to ensure that people did not continue to be held down, as heretofore, in superstition and the grossest monkish deception. Amongst reasonable people, such could not be deemed a crime, or else, we must assume that most princes and bishops who are truly working towards this end – and pre-eminently amongst them the Archbishops of Maynz [sic] and Salzburg – have rendered themselves guilty of just such a crime.

Once this cleansing has taken place, as much be the desire of every reasonable person who is well-disposed towards religion, then I declare with the fullest conviction of my soul that the Christian religion is that religion which contains the best and most readily comprehensible grounds for right behavior and the happiness of man – for all [social] classes. I know of no other religion so grounded in Reason, which contains more practical prescriptions/injunctions, and which provides better moral codes more appropriate to the needs of humanity at all times.

It would be the greatest folly to take away from the common man his comfort, without replacing it with something better. I even doubt that/wonder whether [zweifle sogar, ob] it is good to deprive religion of all sensuous rites/practices in order to make the greatness of its teachings more appealing and graphic to many people.

I believe such a religion will one day become the general world-religion, and that solely through its doctrines [rather than its rites and rituals] the human race will enjoy that bliss of which it is even capable here on earth. I even believe that all people’s crimes, failings and offences stem from the fact that they have not yet attained – not by a long way – the strength of conviction that can bring forth the fruits inseperable from the teachings of the Christian religion.

[He clearly distinguishes between Jesus’ actual religion and the ones which falsely insinuates itself as his teachings (i.e. Catholicism, Protestantism, which stand in opposition to science and reason). This should not be misconstrued as support for the Christianity of the masses.]

The following questions are put to the candidate:
1. “Are our civil conditions in the world the destinations that seem to be the end of our nature, or the purposes for which man was placed on this earth, or are they not? Do states, civil obligations, popular religion, fulfill the intentions of men who established them? Do secret associations promote instruction and true human happiness, or are they the children of necessity, of the multifarious wants, of unnatural conditions, or the inventions of vain and cunning men?”
2. “What civil association, what science do you think to the purpose, and what are not?”
3. “Has there ever been any other in the world, is there no other more simple condition, and what do you think of it?”
4. “Does it appear possible, after having gone through all the nonentities of our civil constitutions, to recover for once our first simplicity, and get back to this honorable uniformity?”
5. “How can one begin this noble attempt; by means of open support, by forcible
revolution, or by what other way?”
6. “Does Christianity give us any hint to this purpose? does it not recognize such a
blessed condition as once the lot of man, and as still recoverable?”
7. “But is this holy religion the religion that is now professed by any sect on earth, or is it a better?”
8. “Can we learn this religion–can the world, as it is, bear the light? Do you think that it would be of service, before numerous obstacles are removed, if we taught men this purified religion, sublime philosophy, and the art of governing themselves? Or would not this hurt, by rousing the interested passions of men habituated to prejudices, who would oppose this as wicked?”
9. “May it not be more advisable to do away these corruptions bit by bit, in silence, and for this purpose to propagate these salutary and heart-consoling doctrines in secret?”

[Possible contact with his augoeides.]

Weishaupt:
Diogenes’ Lamp
There are moments in which my mind dares to take a bolder flight above humanity’s usual way of thinking. In such moments, I entertain the belief that I have discovered a different and better system of things. I, together with others, appear to myself to be destined for greater things than wallowing down here with those of my kind, piling up idiocy upon idiocy and error upon error, only to putrefy and disappear forever.
In such moments, I believe that I have discovered how the present moment arises from the past, and how a series of incalculable consequences arises from the present and presses forward towards a common goal. In seeing myself at such a height and gazing in all directions – how utterly different do all things appear to me? How small all the greatness down below now becomes. As I soar higher and higher, one unknown country after another appears before me. My horizons expand I rise, and I breathe more freely. For my confessions and cares remain below, in the depths where their objects lie.
These moments are the happiest of my life. Here is where I become aware of how much a certain spirit of mind can accomplish, and thus how crucial it is that it be genuine and the best. At such times, I do not just comprehend certain higher teachings, I believe that I feel them. Their object lies before me and penetrates my being, and I feel the existence of a God and the necessity of my continuing existence, as much as I feel that I myself exist. When I am in this mood, nothing seems wiser and more reasonable than this system of things. I can rejoice in my fate and convince myself that this path is the only one leading to my happiness.
But alas! I think like this only for moments at a time. And then my mind sinks from its higher flight back down to Earth. I become flesh and blood and am no better than others, think and act just like them, and marvel and quake before things I had just convinced myself were inane. – That is the nature of humanity! That is how much we need the outlook of the future, to diminish our conceit, to feel ourselves weak, small, and imperfect. For nothing is more unbearable and impetuous than a person who is too pleased with himself.

Defender of the Religious Principle

John Quincy Adams:
The law given from Sinai was a civil and municipal as well as a moral and religious code; it contained many statutes adapted to that time only, and to the particular circumstances of the nation to whom it was given; they could of course be binding upon them, and only upon them, until abrogated by the same authority which enacted them, as they afterward were by the Christian dispensation: but many others were of universal application – laws essential to the existence of men in society, and most of which have been enacted by every nation, which ever professed any code of laws.

Thomas Paine:
They contain some good moral precepts such as any man qualified to be a lawgiver or a legislator could produce himself, without having recourse to supernatural intervention.

Hitler, Table Talk (Cameron & Stevens), October 24, 1941:
The Ten Commandments are a code of living to which there’s no refutation. These precepts correspond to irrefragable needs of the human soul; they’re inspired by the best religious spirit, and the Churches here support themselves on a solid foundation.

Laurency ():
8The so-called ten commandments are no commandments of god. There must be commandments for the less rational people to go by, since without laws no community can exist.

Julian:
As for men’s laws, it is evident that men have established them to correspond with their own natural dispositions; that is to say, constitutional and humane laws were established by those in whom a humane disposition had been fostered above all else, savage and inhuman laws by those in whom there lurked and was inherent the contrary disposition. For lawgivers have succeeded in adding but little by their discipline to the natural characters and aptitudes of men.

Origen:
He [Celsus] next proceeds to recommend, that in adopting opinions we should follow reason and a rational guide, since he who assents to opinions without following this course is very liable to be deceived. And he compares inconsiderate believers to Metragyrtae, and soothsayers, and Mithrae, and Sabbadians, and to anything else that one may fall in with, and to the phantoms of Hecate, or any other demon or demons. For as amongst such persons are frequently to be found wicked men, who, taking advantage of the ignorance of those who are easily deceived, lead them away whither they will, so also, he says, is the case among Christians. And he asserts that certain persons who do not wish either to give or receive a reason for their belief, keep repeating, “Do not examine, but believe!” and, “Your faith will save you!” And he alleges that such also say, “The wisdom of this life is bad, but that foolishness is a good thing!”
To which we have to answer, that if it were possible for all to leave the business of life, and devote themselves to philosophy, no other method ought to be adopted by any one, but this alone. For in the Christian system also it will be found that there is, not to speak at all arrogantly, at least as much of investigation into articles of belief, and of explanation of dark sayings, occurring in the prophetical writings, and of the parables in the Gospels, and of countless other things, which either were narrated or enacted with a symbolical signification, (as is the case with other systems).
But since the course alluded to is impossible, partly on account of the necessities of life, partly on account of the weakness of men, as only a very few individuals devote themselves earnestly to study, what better method could be devised with a view of assisting the multitude, than that which was delivered by Jesus to the heathen?

Hitler, Mein Kampf:
Of religion the Jew makes a mockery. Morality and decency are described as antiquated prejudices and thus a systematic attack is made to undermine those last foundations on which the national being must rest if the nation is to struggle for its existence in this world.

Washington:
Farewell Address
Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, religion and morality are indispensable supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great pillars of human happiness, these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere politician equally with the pious man ought to respect and to cherish them.

Weishaupt:
Now, because completely reasonable people are one of the rarest things on earth, it follows that there are also very few people whose weakness does not require support of this nature. The positive religions therefore are for kings as they are for beggars; they alone are perhaps capable, where reason falls silent, of setting effective limits both to the arbitrariness of the great and to the anarchy of the rabble. Religion is thus, even in all the oriental despotic states, the sole bastion against arbitrary power.

John Adams:
To Jefferson, April 19, 1817
Twenty times, in the course of my late reading, have I been on the point of breaking out, “This would be the best of all possible worlds, if there was no religion in it!!!” But in this exclamation, I should have been as fanatical as Bryant or Cleverly. Without religion, this world would be something not fit to be mentioned in polite company–I mean hell.
So far from believing in the total and universal depravity of human nature, I believe there is no individual totally depraved. The most abandoned scoundrel that ever existed, never yet wholly extinguished his conscience, and, while conscience remains, there is some religion. Popes, Jesuits, and Sorbonists, and Inquistors have some conscience and some religion. So had Marius and Sylla. Cæsar, Cataline, and Antony, and Augustus had not much more, let Virgil and Horace say what they will. What shall we think of Virgil and Horace, Sallust, Quintillian, Pliny, and even Tacitus? And even Cicero, Brutus, and Seneca? Pompey I leave out of the question, as a mere politician and a soldier. Every one of these great creature has left indelible marks of conscience, and, consequently, of religion, though every one of them has left abundant proofs of profligate violations of their conscience, by their little and great passions and paltry interests.

[And yet he does not once name a Jew as an example.]

Weishaupt:
The different positive religions have disturbed human peace and happiness more than once, but they have also promoted it in many different ways. To all appearances, and judging by the declamations against our current state of ruin, human beings have greatly not improved themselves by this route; but they would certainly be even worse had there not been any positive religions. These religions can themselves be misused, and they serve and indulge people’s passions as soon as they start to brew; but this does not prevent the religions from having influence. We have the positive religions to thank for the fact that a larger portion of humanity has in its own way retained belief in our continuing existence and in a higher world government, including the lessons associated therewith. These, the most important of all lessons, would not have been retained so generally in human memory without the assistance of these religions, and without their contributions humanity would already have exterminated itself from the earth.

Hitler, Table Talk, October 19, 1941:
But one must continue to pay attention to another aspect of the problem. It’s possible to satisfy the needs of the inner life by an intimate communion with nature, or by knowledge of the past. Only a minority, however, at the present stage of the mind’s development, can feel the respect inspired by the unknown, and thus satisfy the metaphysical needs of the soul. The average human being has the same needs, but can satisfy them only by elementary means.

Laurency ():
6The mystics excepted there is a mental need in the religious. And religion must supply this need. The mental needs are different, due to different individual characters and stages of development. The difficulty of a universal religion is for it to be able to meet these different needs. Not all teachings are suited to all. The historical forms of religion have satisfied existing needs, otherwise they could not have arisen. The more everything is internationalized and all learning is made available to all, the more and the stronger do the common mental needs become. A religion suiting all at the stage of culture must seek to supply this common need but also to find possibilities of reaching those at lower stages.

Hitler, Mein Kampf:
We must always bear in mind the fact that, generally speaking, the highest ideals are always the outcome of some profound vital need, just as the most sublime beauty owes its nobility of shape, in the last analysis, to the fact that the most beautiful form is the form that is best suited to the purpose it is meant to serve.

Hitler, Mein Kampf:
It must be noted, too, that the attack on the dogmatic principles underlying ecclesiastical teaching increased steadily in violence, and yet this human world of ours would be inconceivable without the practical existence of a religious belief.
The great masses of a nation are not composed of philosophers. For the masses of the people especially, faith is absolutely the only basis of a moral Weltanschauung.
The various substitutes that have been offered have not shown any results that might warrant us in thinking that they might usefully replace the existing denominations, but if religious teaching and religious faith are to be accepted by the broad masses as active forces in their lives, then the absolute authority of the doctrines of faith must be the foundation of all reality
. There may be a few hundreds of thousands of superior men who can live wisely and intelligently without depending on the general standards that prevail in everyday life, but the millions of others cannot do so.
Now, the place which general custom fills in everyday life, corresponds to that of general laws in the State and dogma in religion. The purely spiritual idea is of itself a changeable thing that may be subjected to endless interpretations. It is only through dogma that it is given a precise and concrete form without which it could not become a living faith. Otherwise, the spiritual idea would never become anything more than a mere metaphysical concept, or rather a philosophical opinion.
Accordingly, the attack on dogma is comparable to an attack on the general laws on which the State is founded, and so this attack would finally lead to complete political anarchy if it were successful, just as the attack on religion would lead to a worthless religious nihilism.
The political leader should not estimate the worth of a religion by taking some of its shortcomings into account, but should ask himself whether there be any practical substitute which is obviously better. Until such a substitute is available only fools and criminals would think of abolishing the existing religion.
Undoubtedly, no small amount of blame for the present unsatisfactory religious situation must be attributed to those who have encumbered the ideal of religion with purely material accessories and have thus given rise to an utterly futile conflict between religion and science. In this conflict, victory will nearly always be on the side of science, although after a bitter struggle, while religion will suffer heavily in the eyes of those who cannot penetrate beneath mere superficial learning.
The greatest damage of all has come from the practice of abusing religious conviction in order to further political aims. Most severe measures should be adopted against these miserable swindlers who look on religion merely as a means that can be exploited to serve political interests, or rather commercial ends.

Weishaupt:
Because positive religion is the reason of the greater masses, and takes the place of pure reason for these people, all positive religions must therefore, in accordance with their purpose, approach the human powers of comprehension, and cannot all start right away with the fruits and the realest ideas. The higher principles, even with their advanced progress and growth, cannot be quite clearly developed and traced back to their final source. Here, to a great extent, authority takes the place of such reasons that are not understood by the masses; therefore they are, for everyone (and there are more than you think), therefore they are, say I, for everyone incapable of locating the genuine and sole reasons for just behavior at their source, a beneficial, extremely necessary surrogate, and simply indispensable. This was the unanimous opinion of all the ancient and modern law-makers, and even the heathens acknowledge this truth. This was even the opinion of Machiavelli, whose testimony is certainly above suspicion.

Hitler, Mein Kampf:
By helping to lift the human being above the level of mere animal existence, Faith really contributes to consolidate and safeguard its own existence. Taking humanity as it exists to-day and taking into consideration the fact that the religious beliefs which it generally holds and which have been consolidated through our education, so that they serve as moral standards in practical life, if we should now abolish religious teaching and not replace it by anything of equal value the result would be that the foundations of human existence would be seriously shaken. We may safely say that man does not live merely to serve higher ideals, but that these ideals, in their turn, furnish the necessary conditions of his existence as a human being. And thus the circle is closed.

Hitler, Table Talk (Cameron & Stevens), October 19, 1941:
One may ask whether the disappearance of Christianity would entail the disappearance of belief in God. That’s not to be desired. The notion of divinity gives most men the opportunity to concretise the feeling they have of supernatural realities. Why should we destroy this wonderful power they have of incarnating the feeling for the divine that is within them?

Hitler, Table Talk (Cameron & Stevens), July 26, 1941:
The people needs a point upon which everybody’s thoughts converge, an idol.

Laurency ():
1Those having an attractive tendency feel the need of loving, of adoring someone. This is often directed to people, most often to spouse or children. Many people seek out a personal ideal, an idol. And Christianity has provided such idols in the figures of Christ or Virgin Mary. This has been of great importance and has been the actual merit of Christianity.
Whenever the idol can make it easier for us to sense noble feelings and, if only for a moment, attractive vibrations, it fulfils a real purpose. It is a mistake to destroy the ideals of another.

Hitler, Table Talk (Cameron & Stevens), October 19, 1941:
Nobody has the right to deprive simple people of their childish certainties until they’ve acquired others that are more reasonable. Indeed, it’s most important that the higher belief should be well established in them before the lower belief has been removed. We must finally achieve this. But it would serve no purpose to replace an old belief by a new one that would merely fill the place left vacant by its predecessor.

Weishaupt:
“We all want to enjoy our existence happily and without any hinderances.” That is all that we want, and all the reason in the world could not provide us with anything better. For this reason, morality cannot be anything but a doctrine of happiness. It is the science or art that teaches people how to enjoy life in the safest and most lasting way. Morality that teaches the most reliable means to that end is the only reasonable and true morality. This is what nature and Reason desire, and for that reason it cannot be unsound. In every system, this goal will be the Single and Highest goal, whether there is a future or not.

Hitler, Mein Kampf:
For a Weltanschhauung is intolerant and cannot permit another to exist side by side with it. It imperiously demands its own recognition as unique and exclusive and a complete transformation in accordance with its views throughout all the branches of public life. It can never allow the previous state of affairs to continue in existence by its side. And the same holds true of religions.

Weishaupt:
The positive religions are the only reason of which the greater portion of humanity is capable at this time, and this applies above all to the positive religions that do not openly ruin morality, that are based on the belief in God and in immortality, without exception, only some more or less than others. Their main business all aims for the same thing, and they spare the people the more profound proofs. They merely use different means, and bear the stamp of the time and the genii of the peoples among whom they arose. They are all arranged in accordance with humanity’s greater and lesser susceptibility, and as soon as this changes they too are modified to better correspond to it. The fundamental teachings are the same on all sides, only the drapery and presentation vary, just as the languages will vary in which they are first taught.
Truths necessary for all human beings to act, in situations where none of the best proofs are proven due to human incapacity, must at the very least be believed. All the higher principles of reason are of this nature. The positive religions can therefore absolutely correctly be viewed as philosophy, and every true philosophy can be viewed as a religion, and the one or other of these two, philosophy or religion, must necessarily be false when they are in contradiction to one another. Both can be misunderstood and abused, and unfortunately both are abused.
Let us therefore make the conclusion that derives from this. Every religion in a country deserves to be protected and maintained, and may even less be subjected to violent upheaval. Every one of them deserves the protection and respect of reasonable philosophers, even when they do not profess that faith. The philosophers will not fail to recognize their religious flaws and wish they could be purified in a gentle, unnoticeable way. Philosophers will honor the maintenance within the existing state religion of public order, public safety, themselves. It will be as valuable to them as their own peace and safety.

[Excepting Judaism]

Hitler, Table Talk (Cameron & Stevens), October 14, 1941:
I envisage the future, therefore, as follows: First of all, to each man his private creed. Superstition shall not lose its rights. The Party is sheltered from the danger of competing with the religions. These latter must simply be forbidden from interfering in future with temporal matters. From the tenderest age, education will be imparted in such a way that each child will know all that is important to the maintenance of the State. As for the men close to me, who, like me, have escaped from the clutches of dogma, I’ve no reason to fear that the Church will get its hooks on them. We’ll see to it that the Churches cannot spread abroad teachings in conflict with the interests of the State. We shall continue to preach the doctrine of National Socialism, and the young will no longer be taught anything but the truth.

Ralph Waldo Trine:
Let us not be among the number so dwarfed, so limited, so bigoted as to think that the Infinite God has revealed Himself to one little handful of His children, in one little quarter of the globe, and at one particular period of time.
This is not the pattern by which God works. When we fully realize this truth we shall then see that it makes but little difference what particular form of religion one holds to, but it does make a tremendous difference how true he is to the vital principles of this one. In the degree that we love self less and love truth more, in that degree will we care less about converting people to our particular way of thinking, but all the more will we care to aid them in coming into the full realization of truth through the channels best adapted to them. The doctrine of our master, says the Chinese, consisted solely in integrity of heart. We shall find as we search that this is the doctrine of everyone who is at all worthy the name of master.
The great fundamental principles of all religions are the same. They differ only in their minor details according to the various degrees of unfoldment of different people. I am sometimes asked To what religion do you belong?’ What religion? Why, bless you, there is only one religion… There are, of course, the various creeds of the same religion arising from the various interpretations of different people, but they are all of minor importance. The more unfolded the soul the less important do these minor differences become. There are also, of course the various so-called religions. In reality, however, there is but one religion.

[Excepting Judaism]

Hitler, Table Talk, October 14, 1941:
I envisage the future, therefore, as follows: First of all, to each man his private creed. Superstition shall not lose its rights. The Party is sheltered from the danger of competing with the religions. These latter must simply be forbidden from interfering in future with temporal matters. From the tenderest age, education will be imparted in such a way that each child will know all that is important to the maintenance of the State. As for the men close to me, who, like me, have escaped from the clutches of dogma, I’ve no reason to fear that the Church will get its hooks on them. We’ll see to it that the Churches cannot spread abroad teachings in conflict with the interests of the State. We shall continue to preach the doctrine of National Socialism, and the young will no longer be taught anything but the truth.


Laurency ():
The so-called ten commandments are no commandments of god. There must be commandments for the less rational people to go by, since without laws no community can exist.
Table Talk, October 24, 1941 (Trevor-Roper):
The Ten Commandments are a code of living to which there’s no refutation. These precepts correspond to irrefragable needs of the human soul; they’re inspired by the best religious spirit, and the Churches here support themselves on a solid foundation.
Laurency ():
The Jewish commandments (the Decalogue of Moses) are no “divine commandments”. In all forgotten cultures they were self-evident knowledge: not to murder, steal, deceive, slander, etc.
Julian:
Against the Galileans
As for men’s laws, it is evident that men have established them to correspond with their own natural dispositions; that is to say, constitutional and humane laws were established by those in whom a humane disposition had been fostered above all else, savage and inhuman laws by those in whom there lurked and was inherent the contrary disposition. For lawgivers have succeeded in adding but little by their discipline to the natural characters and aptitudes of men.
Strabo:
The Geography, Book XVI, Chapter II
This is according to nature, and common both to Greeks and barbarians. For, as members of a civil community, they live according to a common law; otherwise it would be impossible for the mass to execute any one thing in concert (in which consists a civil state), or to live in a social state at all. Law is twofold, divine and human. The ancients regarded and respected divine, in preference to human, law; in those times, therefore, the number of persons was very great who consulted oracles, and, being desirous of obtaining the advice of Jupiter, hurried to Dodona, “ to hear the answer of Jove from the lofty oak.

Hitler, Table Talk, October 19, 1941 (Trevor-Roper):
One may ask whether the disappearance of Christianity would entail the disappearance of belief in God. That’s not to be desired. The notion of divinity gives most men the opportunity to concretise the feeling they have of supernatural realities. Why should we destroy this wonderful power they have of incarnating the feeling for the divine that is within them?
Laurency ():
1Those having an attractive tendency feel the need of loving, of adoring someone. This is often directed to people, most often to spouse or children. Many people seek out a personal ideal, an idol. And Christianity has provided such idols in the figures of Christ or Virgin Mary. This has been of great importance and has been the actual merit of Christianity. Whenever the idol can make it easier for us to sense noble feelings and, if only for a moment, attractive vibrations, it fulfils a real purpose. It is a mistake to destroy the ideals of another.
Hitler, Table Talk, July 26, 1941 (Trevor-Roper):
The people needs a point upon which everybody’s thoughts converge, an idol.
Hitler, Table Talk, October 19, 1941 (Trevor-Roper):
Nobody has the right to deprive simple people of their childish certainties until they’ve acquired others that are more reasonable. Indeed, it’s most important that the higher belief should be well established in them before the lower belief has been removed. We must finally achieve this. But it would serve no purpose to replace an old belief by a new one that would merely fill the place left vacant by its predecessor.
Mein Kampf:
The political leader should not estimate the worth of a religion by taking some of its shortcomings into account, but should ask himself whether there be any practical substitute which is obviously better. Until such a substitute is available only fools and criminals would think of abolishing the existing religion.

Laurency ():
6The mystics excepted there is a mental need in the religious. And religion must supply this need. The mental needs are different, due to different individual characters and stages of development. The difficulty of a universal religion is for it to be able to meet these different needs. Not all teachings are suited to all. The historical forms of religion have satisfied existing needs, otherwise they could not have arisen. The more everything is internationalized and all learning is made available to all, the more and the stronger do the common mental needs become. A religion suiting all at the stage of culture must seek to supply this common need but also to find possibilities of reaching those at lower stages.
Mein Kampf:
We must always bear in mind the fact that, generally speaking, the highest ideals are always the outcome of some profound vital need, just as the most sublime beauty owes its nobility of shape, in the last analysis, to the fact that the most beautiful form is the form that is best suited to the purpose it is meant to serve.
Weishaupt:
Their main business all aims for the same thing, and they spare the people the more profound proofs. They merely use different means, and bear the stamp of the time and the genii of the peoples among whom they arose. They are all arranged in accordance with humanity’s greater and lesser susceptibility, and as soon as this changes they too are modified to better correspond to it. The fundamental teachings are the same on all sides, only the drapery and presentation vary, just as the languages will vary in which they are first taught.

Hitler, Table Talk, July 11-12, 1941 (Trevor-Roper):
Let it not be said that Christianity brought man the life of the soul, for that evolution was in the natural order of things.
Laurency ():
1The falsification of history brought about by theologians also includes the assertion that we owe the ideals of humanity to Christianity. Theologians maintain that humanism – the idea of universal brotherhood – was first proclaimed by Christianity. They have even succeeded in smuggling into the “learned world” the fiction that humanism is the merit of Christianity. Thousands of cribbers still seek to implant that dogma in the minds of each new generation so as to turn it into an axiom of history.
2The truth is, however, that humanism was found in the teachings of the Buddha and of Pythagoras, of Laozi and of Kongfuzi, teachings which are at least six hundred years older than Christianity. The humanists were initiates of the knowledge orders of the planetary hierarchy, and it was in these orders that tolerance and brotherhood were proclaimed for the first time.
3These humanists were in bad favour with the Church, very often persecuted. The persecution of humanists, however, did not prevent the Church from stealing their ideas. The victory of a new idea once gained, the Church always preached it not to seem too much behind the times. And afterwards the Church never omitted to point out its pioneering contribution.
4The more profoundly you study the history of Christian persecution of dissenters, the more you are taken aback by the impudence with which theologians praise the contribution of “Christianity” to development. Reason and humanity triumphed, not thanks to Christianity but in spite of it. And the cost of that struggle for freedom in terms of victims of the noblest members of mankind is quite simply incalculable.

Hitler, Table Talk, October 14, 1941 (Trevor-Roper):
But one must continue to pay attention to another aspect of the problem. It’s possible to satisfy the needs of the inner life by an intimate communion with nature, or by knowledge of the past. Only a minority, however, at the present stage of the mind’s development, can feel the respect inspired by the unknown, and thus satisfy the metaphysical needs of the soul. The average human being has the same needs, but can satisfy them only by elementary means.

Laurency ():
4Only a minority of the present mankind has reached the stage of culture and higher stages. This has had the result that no nations or communities in historical times have been cultures, only civilizations.
8The culture of form shall be based on and spring naturally from the culture of consciousness. Then its creations will be beautiful, ennobling and edifying emotion and
thought. The experience of beauty has a power of raising man to higher levels, a power that is as yet little understood. For the experience of beauty is the nearest and easiest path to higher realities for the majority of people. Here the culture of form – art in the widest sense – has a great and noble task before it.
9And not just art. Living nature is the most important source of our experience of the beauty of forms. More and more people understand today that the preservation of nature is necessary to the survival of our bodies. But how many understand that it is necessary also to the survival of our souls?

The American Founding Fathers’ Deism

Jefferson:
[The Jew’s] system was Deism; that is, the belief of one only God. But their ideas of him and of his attributes were degrading and injurious.

Thomas Paine:
…That the only true religion is deism, by which I then meant and now mean the belief of one God, and an imitation of his moral character, or the practice of what are called moral virtues;

[By one god, they didn’t mean it in a monotheistic or tribalistic sense.]

Paine:
But the christian story of God the Father putting his son to death, or employing people to do it, (for that is the plain language of the story,) cannot be told by a parent to a child; and to tell him that it was done to make mankind happier and better, is making the story still worse; as if mankind could be improved by the example of murder; and to tell him that all this is a mystery, is only making an excuse for the incredibility of it.
How different is this to the pure and simple profession of Deism! The true deist has but one Deity; and his religion consists in contemplating the power, wisdom, and benignity of the Deity in his works, and in endeavouring to imitate him in every thing moral, scientifical, and mechanical.
The religion that approaches the nearest of all others to true Deism, in the moral and benign part thereof, is that professed by the quakers: but they have contracted themselves too much by leaving the works of God out of their system. Though I reverence their philanthropy, I can not help smiling at the conceit, that if the taste of a quaker could have been consulted at the creation, what a silent and drab-colored creation it would have been! Not a flower would have blossomed its gaieties, nor a bird been permitted to sing.

Ernst Haeckel:
The Riddle of the Universe
According to this creationist theory, then, God has “made the world out of nothing.” It is supposed that God (a rational, but immaterial, being) existed by himself for an eternity before he resolved to create the world.
Some supporters of the theory restrict God’s creative function to one single act; they believe that this extramundane God (the rest of whose life is shrouded in mystery) created the substance of the world in single moment, endowed it with the faculty of the most extensive evolution, and troubled no further about it.
This view may be found, for instance, in the English Deists in many forms. It approaches very close to our monistic theory of evolution, only abandoning it in the one instance in which God accomplished the creation.
Other creationists contend that God did not confine himself to the mere creation of matter, but that he continues to be operative as the “sustainer and ruler of the world.” Different modifications of this belief are found, some approaching very close to pantheism and others to complete theism.
All these and similar forms of belief in creation are incompatible with the law of the persistence of matter and force; that law knows nothing of a beginning.

Paine:
Almost the only parts in the book called the Bible, that convey to us
any idea of God, are some chapters in Job, and the 19th Psalm; I recollect
no other. Those parts are true deistical compositions; for they treat of the Deity through his works. They take the book of Creation as the word of God; they refer to no other book; and all the inferences they make are drawn from that volume.

Paine:
We scarcely meet with anything, a few phrases excepted, but what deserves either our abhorrence or our contempt, till we come to the miscellaneous parts of the Bible. In the anonymous publications, the Psalms, and the Book of Job, more particularly in the latter, we find a great deal of elevated sentiment reverentially expressed of the power and benignity of the Almighty; but they stand on no higher rank than many other compositions on similar subjects, as well before that time as since.

Paine:
But some perhaps will say—Are we to have no word of God—no revelation? I answer yes. There is a Word of God; there is a revelation. The Word of God is the Creation We Behold: And it is in this word, which no human invention can counterfeit or alter, that God speaketh universally to man.

Paine:
Deism then teaches us, without the possibility of being deceived, all that is necessary or proper to be known. The creation is the Bible of the deist. He there reads, in the hand-writing of the Creator himself, the certainty of his existence, and the immutability of his power; and all other Bibles and Testaments are to him forgeries.

Paine:
In truth, there is no such thing as redemption; that it is fabulous; and that man stands in the same relative condition with his Maker he ever did stand, since man existed; and that it is his greatest consolation to think so. Let him believe this, and he will live more consistently and morally, than by any other system.

Paine:
Were a man impressed as fully and strongly as he ought to be with the
belief of a God, his moral life would be regulated by the force of belief;
he would stand in awe of God, and of himself, and would not do the
thing that could not be concealed from either. To give this belief the full
opportunity of force, it is necessary that it acts alone. This is deism.

Comparison between Jefferson and Hitler

Jefferson:
Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XVII
Subject opinion to coercion: whom will you make your inquisitors? Fallible men; men governed by bad passions, by private as well as public reasons. And why subject it to coercion? To produce uniformity. But is uniformity of opinion desireable? No more than of face and stature. Introduce the bed of Procrustes then, and as there is danger that the large men may beat the small, make us all of a size, by lopping the former and stretching the latter. Difference of opinion is advantageous in religion. The several sects perform the office of a censor morum over each other. Is uniformity attainable? Millions of innocent men, women, and children, since the introduction of Christianity, have been burnt, tortured, fined, imprisoned; yet we have not advanced one inch towards uniformity. What has been the effect of coercion? To make one half the world fools, and the other half hypocrites. To support roguery and error all over the earth.
Let us reflect that it is inhabited by a thousand millions of people. That these profess probably a thousand different systems of religion. That ours is but one of that thousand. That if there be but one right, and ours that one, we should wish to see the 999 wandering sects gathered into the fold of truth. But against such a majority we cannot effect this by force. Reason and persuasion are the only practicable instruments. To make way for these, free enquiry must be indulged; and how can we wish others to indulge it while we refuse it ourselves.

Hitler, Table Talk (Cameron & Stevens), October 24, 1941:
For a world population of two thousand two hundred and fifty millions, one can count on the earth a hundred and seventy religions of a certain importance—each of them claiming, of course, to be the repository of the truth. At least a hundred and sixty-nine of them, therefore, are mistaken! Amongst the religions practised to-day, there is none that goes back further than two thousand five hundred years. But there have been human beings, in the baboon category, for at least three hundred thousand years. There is less distance between the man-ape and the ordinary modern man than there is between the ordinary modern man and a man like Schopenhauer. In comparison with this millenary past, what does a period of two thousand years signify?

Hitler, Table Talk (Cameron & Stevens), February 20, 1942:
Dogma cannot resist the ceaselessly renewed attacks of the spirit of free enquiry.

Jefferson:
Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XVII
The error seems not sufficiently eradicated, that the operations of the mind, as well as the acts of the body, are subject to the coercion of the laws. But our rulers can have authority over such natural rights only as we have submitted to them. The rights of conscience we never submitted, we could not submit. We are answerable for them to our God. The legitimate powers of government extend to such acts only as are injurious to others. But it does me no injury for my neighbour to say there are twenty gods, or no god. It neither picks my pocket nor breaks my leg. If it be said, his testimony in a court of justice cannot be relied on, reject it then, and be the stigma on him. Constraint may make him worse by making him a hypocrite, but it will never make him a truer man. It may fix him obstinately in his errors, but will not cure them.
Reason and free enquiry are the only effectual agents against error. Give a loose to them, they will support the true religion, by bringing every false one to their tribunal, to the test of their investigation. They are the natural enemies of error, and of error only. Had not the Roman government permitted free enquiry, Christianity could never have been introduced. Had not free enquiry been indulged, at the aera of the reformation, the corruptions of Christianity could not have been purged away. If it be restrained now, the present corruptions will be protected, and new ones encouraged.

Mein Kampf:
Nature knows no political frontiers. She begins by establishing life on this globe and then watches the free play of forces. Those who show the greatest courage and industry are the children nearest to her heart and they will be granted the sovereign right of existence.
Thomas Jefferson:
Those who labour in the earth are the chosen people of God, if ever he had a chosen people, whose breasts he has made his peculiar deposit for substantial and genuine virtue.
It is the focus in which he keeps alive that sacred fire, which otherwise might escape from the face of the earth. Corruption of morals in the mass of cultivators is a phaenomenon of which no age nor nation has furnished an example. It is the mark set on those, who not looking up to heaven, to their own soil and industry, as does the husbandman, for their subsistance, depend for it on the casualties and caprice of customers.
Dependance begets subservience and venality, suffocates the germ of virtue, and prepares fit tools for the designs of ambition.

Rosenberg (Memoirs):
The Führer correctly differentiated between the religious beliefs of the individual and political reasoning. What his own beliefs were he never told me in so many words. Once, at table, he said a high-placed Italian had asked him point-blank what his religious beliefs were. He had begged permission not to answer that question.
Thomas Jefferson:
To Benjamin Rush, April 21, 1803
I am moreover averse to the communication of my religious tenets to the public; because it would countenance the presumption of those who have endeavored to draw them before that tribunal, and to seduce public opinion to errect itself into that inquisition over the rights of conscience which the laws have so justly proscribed. It behooves every man who values liberty of conscience for himself to resist invasions of it in the case of others, or their case may, by change of circumstances, become his own. It behooves him, too, in his own case, to give no example of concession, betraying the right of independent opinion by answering questions of faith, which the laws have left between God and himself.

To John Adams, January 11, 1817
Say nothing of my religion. It is known to my God and myself alone. Its evidence before the world is to be sought in my life; if that has been honest and dutiful to society, the religion which has regulated it cannot be a bad one.

Jefferson:
Notes on the State of Virginia, Query XVII
Was the government to prescribe to us our medicine and diet, our bodies would be in such keeping as our souls are now. Thus in France the emetic was once forbidden as a medicine, and the potatoe as an article of food. Government is just as infallible too when it fixes systems in physics. Galileo was sent to the inquisition for affirming that the earth was a sphere: the government had declared it to be as flat as a trencher, and Galileo was obliged to abjure his error. This error however at length prevailed, the earth became a globe, and Descartes declared it was whirled round its axis by a vortex. The government in which he lived was wise enough to see that this was no question of civil jurisdiction, or we should all have been involved by authority in vortices. In fact, the vortices have been exploded, and the Newtonian principle of gravitation is now more firmly established, on the basis of reason, than it would be were the government to step in, and to make it an article of necessary faith. Reason and experiment have been indulged, and error has fled before them. It is error alone which needs the support of government. Truth can stand by itself.

Quran 2:256
Let there be no compulsion in religion: Truth stands out clear from error:

Goebbels, May 1st, 1945:
Do not let yourself be disconcerted by the worldwide clamor that will now begin. There will come a day, when all the lies will collapse under their own weight, and truth will again triumph.

Philosophy

Weishaupt
Pythagoras oder Betrachtungen über die geheime Welt und RegierungsKunst, p.g. 171-174:
That there are peoples who must be treated in this way, in whom no nobler and more rational treatment is of some success, proves nothing for this so humiliating assertion; it does not prove that man has no nobler destiny, that he will not refine himself; it merely proves that there are different stages of culture, that man, according to his present receptiveness, must be dealt with at present, that this is at most the means to bring about the obedience of peoples who are at a very low level of culture because nothing has happened to their higher culture. – If man is not capable of a refinement, why were there times when he was still less? Why has he become more? Why do we want to despair that he can become even more? What is a world in which only blindness, stupidity, and wickedness are possible, enlightenment and morality are the only impossible things? Why have we been so much,if all further steps are impossible? Why all ideals, if they can never be reached, even if all annoyances are impossible? Why all religion, education and education? How is the possibility possible where the refinement of man is impossible? What is a world in which virtue is the only impossible thing? Why do we have these lofty concepts of perfection, glow, and virtue? Why are we talking about it? Why do we give so much trouble to appear virtuous?

“A society, which by the finest and most secure means achieves the goal, to ensure the victory of virtue and wisdom over folly in the world, to achieve the most important discoveries in all areas of science, to mold its members into noble and great persons, and to ensure certain rewards even in this world for their perfection, to protect them from persecution, ill fate, and oppression, and tie the hands of any kind of despotism.”

“To raise humanity back to its original dignity; to raise morality to its highest degree through wise education; to introduce a general regimen of morals, so that anyone could remain faithful to virtuousness from his inner conviction that only virtue can bring happiness, without coercion; to bind all people to one another with the bonds of brotherhood; to remove all immediate conditions causing poverty, need, and the fight against depravity and immorality by enabling us to govern ourselves and consequently do without all artificial institutions, constitutions and positive laws.”

“Whoever does not close their ears to the lamentations of the miserable, nor their heart to the gentle pity; whoever is the friend and brother of the unfortunate; whoever has a heart capable of love and friendship; whoever is steadfast in adversity, unwearied in carrying out of whatever has been engaged in, undaunted in the overcoming of difficulties, whoever does not mock and despise the weak, whose soul is susceptible of conceiving great designs, desirous of rising superior to base motives, and of distinguishing itself by deeds of benevolence, whoever shuns idleness, whoever considers no knowledge as unessential which they may have the opportunity of acquiring, regarding the knowledge of mankind as their chief study; whoever, when truth and virtue are in question, despising the approbation of the multitude, is sufficiently courageous to follow the dictates of their own heart-such a one is a proper candidate.”

From Diogenes’ Lamp

Weishaupt:
We are creatures of a mixed nature. We are neither pure spirits nor animals. Our way of thinking and reaching conclusions must therefore also be of mixed nature. As creatures of a higher type we cannot be permitted to mistake our more noble determination, but because the stage for our present activity is the sensory world, because we are surrounded by sensory matters on all sides, and our knowledge is acquired by means of these senses, thus humans cannot deny humanity, and this world of the senses with all its goods cannot be valueless for us. The friend of virtue and morality will therefore never become an enemy of humanity.

Weishaupt:
Nothing raises the human mind above all of life’s dangers and disagreeable circumstances, nothing eases the transition to another system of things, as much as the conviction that this life is the preparation and practice for a better and higher life. Let no one say that unbelievers too are capable of tearing asunder the shackles of this life and thus proving that unbelief also has its heroes. Quite the contrary. This “strength” is merely impotence and weakness.

Weishaupt:
For these reasons, the famous question now answers itself: whether a state of atheists could exist, and whether such a state would be able to maintain itself in the long term. This question is accompanied by another question which is disproportionately more important and therefore deserves closer examination. The question: “Are people mature enough today to be able to do without the positive religions? Is it good and appropriate to enlighten the common man and our youth about this, and teach them about their lack of foundation?”
This question is a most delicate one, and its resolution of the sort that could very easily ruin things with all the parts, because it is impossible to satisfy the overexaggerated demands of the two parties in the dispute. The requirements of our times very naturally lead us to this question.
Unfortunately, however, it is to be expected that here, too, humans will not keep to the middle road. And too swift zeal of the one part will not lack ostensible reasons, lifted from current events, to, rather than help elevate religion, instead promote the old-fashioned rule of priests, including the old superstitions. Thus would all means remain contrary to the end, and human beings move inexorably from one extreme condition to another, without improving their foundation; they would believe that others race about because they race themselves, such that in the end even the most reasonable thing would become doubtful, what we actually ought to wish for, because for every old evil to be eliminated a new and worse evil would appear, so that in the end we would have to say to ourselves, in consolation,
“Contentons-nous de celui-ci
De peur d’en recontrer un pire.”
– La Fontaine.

Weishaupt:
I wanted the more reasonable and better people to, in order to save themselves, withstand the seductions and laughter of this world, and not be permitted to become disloyal to their beliefs. To hold together, strengthen one another in their convictions, educate within their circles, and then to authorize to educate, to produce people who abuse religion and power less.

I wanted some of the better to develop an urgent need for both a more precise understanding of humanity and for an independent inner perfection, by means of my placing them into a dangerous situation where they either miss their goal entirely, to their own disadvantage, or are forced to make the study of themselves and of other human beings their lives’ primary concern. Educators and all others who influence people were to first educate themselves, and gather the necessary experience in this school.

To this end, I wanted to influence entire generations, and wanted the transition for all classes and people to a more reasonable general conviction, absolutely inexorable due to the course of nature and our destiny, to be quietly prepared, step-by-step, and to take place without any violent upheavals. I wanted what the representatives of ecclesiastical and worldly power ought to be doing and wanting on the strength of their offices, and I wanted this because they are neglecting it.

I wanted all these things, and I believe to this hour, despite all persecutions already suffered and still lying before me, that this idea is a great one, albeit too premature for such times and thus unluckily calculated. If my contemporaries happen to be of another opinion, to me this appears to prove that their enthusiasm for virtue is capable of growth.
That mistakes occurred cannot be denied, that I erred exquisitely, that I was simple enough to imagine human beings better, less self-serving, and more receptive for that which is good and great than they in fact are, and as I unfortunately have experienced them only too well in the course of this matter.